A Brief Introduction: Tao, Taoism, Tao Te Ching & Lao Tze

The snow goose need not bathe to make itself white.
Neither need you do anything but be yourself.

Lao Tze – Tao Te Ching

Who is Lao Tze

The author of Tao Te Ching (pronounced ‘Dao De Jing’) – a classic Chinese text which heavily influenced Chinese Philosophy – is a fundamental book for the Philosophy and Religion Taoism.

What is Taoism 
Taoism emphasizes the importance of living in harmony with the Tao (Chinese translation ‘The Way’). Taoism refers to Tao as the source, pattern and substance of everything in between. The ethics of Taoism begin with effortless action, naturalness, simplicity, spontaneity and the three treasures – Compassion, Frugality and Humility.

Knowing others is intelligence; knowing yourself is true wisdom.
Mastering others is strength; mastering yourself is true power.”

Lao Tze – Tao Te Ching

What is Tao – The Way
“Tao is the source of all Universes. Tao is the Universal principles and laws. Millions of people in history have searched for Tao, studied Tao and practiced Tao, but only a very small number of people in history have accomplished and reached the goal of Tao.”
Page 2 – TAO I – Dr. & Master Zhi Gang Sha

Click here for an excerpt from the text Tao Te Ching on Self Development

Time is a created thing. To say ‘I don’t have time,’ is like saying, ‘I don’t want to.

Lao Tzu

yin-yang

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“because he does not dwell therein he never departs” Lao Tzu

II – Self Development

TAO TE CHING

‘When everyone recognizes beauty to be only a masquerade, then it is simply ugliness. In the same way, goodness, if it is not sincere, is not goodness. So existence and non-existence are incompatible. The difficult and easy are mutually opposites. Just as the long and short, the high and the low, the loud and soft, the before and the behind, are all opposites and each reveals each other.

Therefore the wise man is not conspicuous in his affairs or given to much talking. Though troubles arise he is not irritated. He produces but does not own; he acts but claims no merit; he builds but does not dwell therein, and because he does not dwell therein he never departs.’

Page 9 / Tao Te Ching – The Ancient Classic / Lao Tzu